Meeting an Islamophobic glare

 

18th November 2014

Two months back when I was in a supermarket at Stockholm, along with a friend, I heard a lady screaming. I was busy looking for things so I didn’t pay much attention. 

“We don’t want terrorists at our place. Go back to Syria or wherever you have come from,” she said in a scathing tone.

The voice became fierce enough to catch my attention. As I turned back, I was amazed to know that this lady, with a boy cut and wrinkled face, isn’t addressing anyone but me.

She approached me as I went a bit closer to her to hear her words clearly.

All in the place I was the only girl with a Headscarf -- which is seen as something objectionable by most of the westerners. 

During my first week at Sweden it was for the first time I faced ire for covering my head. 

As her words grew more intense I heard this word ‘terrorist’. 

“We don’t want terrorists at our place. Go back to Syria or wherever you have come from,” she said in a scathing tone.

I asked her to explain, ‘how do I look like a terrorist’ but in her gust of anger my words fail to fall on her ears seemingly. 

There was repetition in her words, “go away from my country, go away from my country, we don’t want terrorists at our place.” 

That night I suddenly felt that I meeting Islamophobic glare almost everywhere

My mercury began to shoot up and I shouted out, “I am in no way here to occupy your bloody country.” 

As soon as she finished with my Hijab she brought my religion in and began to falsify my beliefs by displaying her cross. 

I kind of put up with her terrorist theory because that is the way they perceive us – Muslims.

Hijab—which is a part of identity of any Muslim women – became symbol of terror that night. 

I felt a rage inside, by her comments, when my friend who was roaming around joined me. She tried to pacify me and took me to the other side. 

I turned back to find the lady but she disappeared somewhere in the crowd.  

None standing there asked the lady to chuck out and everyone was staring me as if I was pointing gun at all standing over there. 

Hijab—which is a part of identity of any Muslim women – became symbol of terror that night. 

That night I and my Pakistani friend Muneera had a long chat over the matter. 

That night I suddenly felt that I meeting Islamophobic glare almost everywhere.

 

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